Planning a Successful Yard Sale

You’ve decided to host a yard sale. I’m not sure about you, but for me its an exciting endeavor. But, it’s not as simple as putting signs out and setting your items on your lawn. If you want really want to knock it out of the park, you’ll want to do some preparation.

 

 

Plan and Prepare Early!

It’s best to start collecting items early and store them in bags or boxes until its time to start the journey of pricing. Give yourself plenty of time to collect items and stock up, as many sale-goers are attracted to the larger sales. Also, more options means more opportunities to make money.

 

Date

One of the most important parts of the sale? The date, of course! You want to select your date well in advance to plan around. Weather will always impact turnout, so be sure to consider this when planning.

The date is also important because you will also need to check with your city to see if you will need to purchase a permit or license to host a sale at your home. Looking into this ahead of time will save a headache and potential fees.

 

Location

Now think about your location. Do you have enough space for the amount of items that you would like to sell? If not, you may want to look in to co-hosting a sale with a friend who has more space. Co-hosting  a sale also means more help, more items, and the need for more organization.

 

Tables

Tables. Do you have enough tables? I know I didn’t for my first garage sale. You don’t want items to be too cluttered and you certainly don’t want too many things laying in the grass, so think ahead and ask friends to borrow folding tables if you think you will need them. More space is always better than less.

 

Pricing Your Items

As you collect items, it’s helpful to price as you. When pricing, always ask yourself what you would reasonably pay for this item if you saw it at a yard sale.

On her blog, Money Saving Mom, Crystal Paine writes, “I’d rather price something on the low end and have someone actually buy my item, than to have 25 people pick up the item and put I back down on the table because it’s too expensive.”

Also, make sure you write clearly or use pre-made labels that you can pick up from any local hardware store. The price should not be a scavenger hunt or require the customer to ask you for clarification.

For those of you who think you’ll skip the pricing items ahead of time, know that customers often don’t like asking for pricing, and are shy about bartering. They want a hassle-free experience.

 

Advertising for Your Sale

Getting the word out about your sale is crucial.

If you’re a real go-getter, create flyers the week before your sale and hang them around local hotspots like coffee shops and grocery store bulletin boards. Make them clear and bold with all of the necessary information.

If you’re a not quite ambitious enough to make flyers, use of the amazing technology at your fingertips and mention your sale on Facebook or post it to Craigslist. On Craigslist there is an entire section dedicated to garage sales. Remember, pictures always help! If you’ve got items that are higher value, be sure to include photos and mention them specifically in your post.

 

The Day Before Your Sale

The day before your sale will arrive faster than you realize. If you’ve got helpers, consider delegating the tasks mentioned below ahead of time.

Most important, be sure to check the weather for the days that your sale will span over. If you see potential rain, you will want to move items either into the garage or back into the home. While it’s not ideal, you want to preserve your items from the rain as much as possible, and you don’t want all of your marketing efforts to go to waste.

Don’t forget to stop at the bank and get plenty of small bills and coin! You do not want to run out of change in the middle of a sale and remember that most banks aren’t open at all on Sundays.

Try to organize and clean your sale area as much as possible the night before. Sweeping the garage and covering items that are not for sale with a bed sheet will eliminate customer confusion and put focus on the items actually on sale. Setting up tables and laying out whatever items you can will end up saving you time and stress the next morning. While setting up those tables, try to create some sort of organization between toys, clothing, books, etc. If a customer is looking for something specific, then they will be able to pick it out much quicker. Again, double check that all of the items are priced!

Put the kids to work and make signs to stake around the neighborhood that have all of the date and time information with arrows directing potential customers to your sale. Make sure that the writing is clear and the arrows are pointing in the correct direction. Including an address is a great way to ensure folks find their way.

 

The Day of Your Sale

The day you have planned for is finally here!

Be sure to get your neighborhood signs out early in the morning and have everything set up. Before the sale starts, make sure to double check that your doors are locked to the house to detour any opportunists.

You can also get the kids involved and have them set up a lemonade/cookie stand to offer refreshments to customers, for purchase of course.

During the day, keep track of your money by keeping your “cash box” on you and use either a fanny pack or an apron. This will not only provide for more security, but also allow you to more easily assist customers.

With the check out process, set up a wrapping station with bags, boxes and newspaper where customers can wrap their new-found treasures as they feel necessary. This will save time for you and save resources as many people may not find they need a bag or items wrapped. Not to mention, it’s a great way to get rid of all those Amazon boxes that have piled up.

When sales come your way, be sure and be flexible with any offers or negotiations that come your way. As mentioned earlier, it is better to sell something at a lower price rather than to lose out on a sale completely.

 

Post-Sale

Once your sale is complete and you have (hopefully) made plenty of money, you may find yourself with a few items left over. There are a few options that you can chose from if you absolutely do not want to keep said items.

First, you can simply create a FREE sign and make a pile at the end of your driveway, or you can schedule a pick up or drop off items at a local donation center like Goodwill or the Salvation Army.

No matter what the outcome our your sale, we hope that you enjoy the excitement that comes with it and have fun.

 

House Hunting

House Hunting: Open Houses

Finding a new home can be a daunting task. Each member of the family has a laundry list of items they’d like and making all of those requests come together in one home can be difficult.  Alas, it’s always possible that perfect house out there!

Thankfully, we have the internet now, which provides amazing ways to see houses available for sale. You can view photos of each room in the home, take virtual tours and many realtors create videos to give you the feeling of walking through the home itself.

Although, that virtual tour isn’t always enough. That’s where open houses come in. They help you better understand the space.  The question is, how do you make the most of going to an open house?  Below, we’ve put together some tips and tricks on how to do that.

 

Finding Open Houses

First, let’s talk about research. Realtor.com has a great search function that can be used to find upcoming open houses in your desired area.  Search by zip code, city or county then select ‘Open House’ within preferences and you instantly have a list of houses that you could visit. The other great thing about this search engine is that it compiles properties from a wide variety of realtors, so there is no need to go from site-to-site to collect all of the information. It’s all in one, easy-to-use spot.

 

Map Your Path

Once you have found several properties that interest you and you’d like to visit in person, create a gameplan. Open houses tend to be on Sundays starting around noon and going until mid-afternoon. Often times, each house is only open for two hours so time management and planning is essential.

Make note of the timing for each house you are interested in, then create a map starting with the house that opens earliest out of your group.  Keep going down the line based on times available and establish how much time you’d like to spend at each location.  If you would like to spend at least a half hour in each, then aim to visit three houses in an afternoon.  Don’t forget to take drive time between locations into account.  Keep in mind, if you miss an open house you can always reach out to the realtor and schedule a private showing.

It’s also a good idea to make note of any questions you have after looking at the homes’ online. If you notice a listing doesn’t have photos of the garage, make a note.

 

Open House Day

Plan in hand, you’re ready to go and find your potential new home! If you have created set times to arrive and leave homes, keep an eye on the time so that you don’t miss out on the other houses you’d like to see.

Make the most of your time at each location. Don’t be shy to asking questions! The realtor is there to help and they are full of information, often times knowing far more than what is published on line.  Trulia has a great list of questions that’s worth checking out.

When visiting each home as a potential buyer you are not obligated to leave any sort of contact information for later. However, if they property catches your eye, be sure to take a card with the realtor’s information. This contact information will come in handy should you have any other further questions and/or you have interest in making an offer.

 

Don’t Forget Etiquette

It’s very easy to get caught up looking at a beautiful home, but make sure that if you want to take any photos you ask the realtor before doing so.  Most times they will say yes, but it is always polite to offer them the option to say no in case the seller has requested no photos.

Also, keep in mind that you are not the only one viewing the home. Any negative comments or notes about the home should be kept to yourself. Sometimes, realtors will wander the house in case visitors have any questions and the last thing they want is to hear negative remarks about their listing. Instead, carry a small notepad with you and make note of any parts of the house that you like or dislike. This will come in handy later once you’ve visited all of the homes and want to discuss.

If there are other groups of buyers in one room, allow them enough time to explore before entering with your group. This is common courtesy that should not be forgotten.

 

Post-Visits

You’re back after your afternoon of viewing potential homes! You’ve got all of your notes and maybe some photos, but what do you do with that information?

First, sort out everything by property and begin reviewing your notes. While you go through all of the information, keep your (family’s) wish list close by for reference. Consider factors like price, upkeep, and location. It will be very hard to find a home with every single feature on your list. Be flexible and prioritize.

If you find yourself with questions about certain properties, reach out to the listing agent directly. If there is a property that you are especially drawn to, set up a follow up private showing. It may just be the home for you.

If you follow the guidelines above, we’re sure you’ll eventually find the home you’re looking for in an stress-free, efficient manner.

Moving into a Smaller Space

Minimalistic living is quite a trend lately, so it’s no surprise that the moving industry has seen an uptick in moves to smaller spaces.  Many people who opted for the minimalistic lifestyle have said it not only removes clutter in their home, but it also clears their minds and takes their focus off nonmatrial things.  If you’re curious to learn more, check out one of the most popular minimalist blogs.

Logistically, moving into a smaller space can be very difficult.  There should be plenty of planning ahead of time to ensure that the move goes smoothly and stress-free.  As a guide, we’ve created a timeline that demonstrates the importance of planning and how to best prepare you and your family for the move.

 

When you begin looking for homes…

The second you start looking for or researching smaller homes, you should begin the process of eliminating clutter and excess items.

 

Get rid of duplicates

Do you, for some odd reason have three copies of Beyonce’s Lemonade? Get rid of two of them.  Also have a dozen copies of Harry Potter books? Pare it down a bit. This step is easiest because you can clearly see that you really only need one of each of these. Create a box or bin for these duplicates, then store it away to later donate them or sell at a yard sale. Either way, you’ve just completed the first step to your small space move!

 

Take a look inside your closet

Here comes the hard part… Somehow every piece of clothing means something or has a use. Even if you haven’t touched it in nine months, you can probably find a way to rationalize keeping it.

Be realistic.  If you pick up an item knowing full well you have not worn it in a year, but begin to say, “you know that you will someday…” keep it moving right out of there! The paring down process needs to be done to be comfortable and happy in your new home.

 

Pick only your favorite décor

A smaller space means less wall space. Not to mention, filling all walls in a smaller space will actually make it seem tighter than it really is. You will want to go for items that mean a lot to you and that make you feel good in order to make most of the space that you have.  When you pick up an item, ask yourself, “Does this piece make me feel good?” If you say no or you have no response to it, set it aside.  Make a box of those items and add them to your future yard sale/donation inventory.

 

Once you find your new home…

The next step is prepping your new space as much as possible. Focusing on creating as much space and storage will save you time and make moving day less stressful. But first, don’t forget to celebrate finding your new spot!

 

Get Inspired!

Start looking at magazines and websites to figure out what style you’d like. Either way, you will be tasked with creating a space that feels larger than it is, but you will still want to decide if you want a modern, sleek look or a cozy, homey feel. This decision will determine the type of storage options that you move forward with.

Loving the modern idea? Check out this website for some ideas. They have houses from around the world and you can look inside each one to see the different design styles.  Or maybe you see yourself in a compact, cozy home? Pinterest has an endless amount of inspiration for you to save and access later.

No matter what style you choose, look at how they make the most of their space. Keep in mind that you can also add storage solutions of your own!

 

Stay on schedule!

Don’t get distracted or sidetracked on your downsizing. You will need to continually keep yourself in check and on task. Try setting reminders on your calendar to keep yourself motivated and know that all of the preparing will pay off when the move date rolls around. As you go back each time to do another round of cleaning out, understand that it will get harder as you go.  Having that mindset ahead of time will actually make it easier.

 

When moving day has come and gone…

Once you’ve completed your move and gotten settled into your new small space, there are a few things that you need to keep in mind as you move forward.

 

Remember that you are in a smaller space now

Obvious statement, right? Well not really. Picture yourself walking into a Target store to grab a few groceries, but then you end up wandering around the store and finding a variety of beautiful decorations. It’s not bad that you found items you like, but will they all fit? Do they all make sense in your new space? When you go out shopping, you will need to always ask yourself, “Where will this go?” After all, you don’t want all of your hard work in preparing for your small space move to go to waste.

 

Understand that you and your family’s habits will need to change

Whether you’ve done the move on your own, you need to prepare yourselves for a lifestyle change. Moving into a small space naturally brings everyone closer together. Be more aware of your personal habits such as leaving magazines laying around, shoes strewn across the floors or dishes on the counter. All of these will make your new space seem even smaller and has the potential to create tension.

Be patient. Small space living will take time to get used to.

 

Always remember why you did this in the first place

Moving into a small space is hard work and you’ve done most of the heavy lifting, now it’s just maintaining your new environment so you can enjoy it. Whether you decided to live smaller because it takes up less energy, brings your family closer together or pushes you to re-focus on the nonmaterial, always keep that as your motivation. At first it may be hard to adjust, but take it from self-proclaimed minimalist, Joshua Becker, you will appreciate living smaller in the long run.

How To Move Your Plants

Plants can add so much to a home; not only are they decorative but they can also increase oxygen levels and clean the air in your home.  So with all that our lovely houseplants provide for us and our homes, it makes sense that we would only want to take good care of them.

Although the process of taking care of plants during a move can be a little tedious, its well worth it.  It all starts before the move and ends a little while after your move, as it takes time for your plants to acclimate to their new setting.

 

Preparing Your Plants

Place your smaller pots into cardboard boxes and surround the pot with crunched up newspapers. This prevents the plant from tipping over during transportation. For extra safety, move any plants in clay or ceramic pots to plastic pots at least two weeks prior to your move.

For larger plants, prune and trim as much as possible. Be sure to check with your local nursery or online before pruning as there are a several species of plants that do not react well to pruning.

For all plants, be sure to water the day before your move and prevent any potential messes in the moving vehicle.  This especially important in the winter, because if the soil has too much water during the move, then there is the potential for freezing. Another way to protect during the brisk winter climate is to cover the plants with an old sheet or tissue paper. Even the smallest contact with extreme cold temperatures can cause trauma to the plant.

If you are moving to a new state with a potentially different climate, do some research to understand how your new home will suit your plants.

If your house looks like this, you may have a big task ahead of you.

Your Plants and Professional Movers

If you have opted to work with a professional moving company and you would like for them to help transport a few of your houseplants, be sure to ask them prior to the move if they are willing to handle plants. During winter months, some moving companies will not transport them as most moving trucks do not have heat in the box.

No matter what, be sure to check for insects and parasites prior to the move and apply insecticide safely prior to the move.

 

Long Distance Moving

If you are driving cross-country to your new home, then there are a few extra steps to ensure the safety of your plants.

First, it is important to check in advance with any states that you will be going through that they allow the transportation of the plants.  To prevent the spreading of certain insects, there is a certification that some states require prior to moving. It’s beneficial to research this ahead of time to avoid any issues. The National Plant Board has very helpful information regarding each state’s regulations.

If you know that the driving trip will take more than a day, then be sure that your plants are still receiving adequate water and light. Be mindful of the temperature in the car too, and never leave them in a vehicle overnight in case of drastic temperature changes.

If you have chosen to ship your plants, then be sure you understand the potential expenses and risks.

Shipping your plants can be very expensive and there are various regulations on carriers which means that you will need to ensure that this is something your selected shipping company can do. Furthermore, there are no guarantees with shipping as you are responsible for appropriately packaging the plant.

 

Moving Day

If you do opt to put your plants into the moving vehicle, then be sure that they are the last items on and the first items off.  Many movers will recommend that you transport them yourself because your car will often be able to provide a safer temperature and the plants may experience less movement impact as well.

 

Post Move

Once you have moved into your new home and you begin settling in, be sure to give your plants that same opportunity. They will need time to adjust to the new environment. If you notice a slight loss of leaves, do not worry, this is fairly normal with any environment change. Finally, be sure not to immediately place the plants back into direct sunlight. Ease them back into it and allow them to acclimate.

Moving During the Holidays

This time of year is filled warm laughter, playing in the snow, drinking hot chocolate, and cozying up next the fire with a loved one. Sometimes it can be tricky to enjoy these things when moving becomes part of your holiday plans. So, in light of the season of giving, we thought we’d share some tips on how to make your holiday move a little easier.

 

Notification of Address Change

One can easily forget the little things like this between time spent baking cookies and wrapping presents. So, first things first, go online to schedule a change of address with USPS.

As for updating friends and family, do a little bit of multitasking. Send your holiday cards early and include a notification of your new address. No need to send out a separate batch of move announcements.

 

Staying Cheerful

You may not have control over your move date, but don’t let that get you down. There are so many wonderful things to look forward to this time of year. Pack your holiday decorations last, let them be a reminder as you pack. By the time you’ve packed everything else, the holiday decorations will seem like a breeze.

It may be staged, but it looks fun!

Labeled Packing

With the season being so busy, it can be difficult at times to slow down and make sure you do things the proper way. Having a labeling system for your packing will make your moving and unpacking experience much easier, and help you get back to your holiday favorites! We recommend color coding with colored sharpies or duct tape, so you or your moving company can easily place items in their specific room. This will also make your holiday boxes more accessible when its time to redecorate.

 

1 Very Full Truck or 2 Half-Full Trucks?

Recently, we here at College Muscle Movers have come across a variety of estimation situations where a customer has so many items that it might require a second truck. If you have spoken with us before, you know we favor a “better safe than sorry” approach, and subsequently always suggest a second truck in these situations.

And so, we often get asked, “If you think that everything might fit into the one truck, why not just try for that?”  To which we have a few answers.

First and foremost, efficiency.  With two trucks, the movers are able to waste less time trying to make absolutely everything fit and put more focus on the overall move. We’d rather get your move done as quickly as possible than waste time puzzle-piecing your items into the truck.

Secondly, there is a lowered risk of higher costs.  With two trucks, the chance of needing to make a second trip is virtually eliminated.  With one truck if not everything fit and a second trip is required, the time increases greatly and the cost along with it. This is especially likely to happen if there are additional items that were not on the original inventory given. With two trucks, there is plenty of extra space.

Finally, and possibly most important there is an increased amount of item safety.  With more space we can pack your items into our truck with their safety in mind, rather than use of space.  In other words, we always pack your items as safely as possible, but with limited space we may need to prioritize getting it all in one load over the safety of certain items.

So what does this mean for price?

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We hope that this helps in your decision making process when not only considering the logistics of your move, but also the professional moving company you decide to hire.

How to Make Moving Fun!

Make a Playlist

Music makes everything better. Even something that can be as stressful and time-consuming as moving.

Before you start packing, put together a playlist of songs that make you want to move or sing along. When I was young, we’d always pull the boom box out when it was time to clean. There’s nothing quite like vacuuming to Gloria Estefan and Shania Twain. Don’t be afraid to include your guilty pleasures.

Be sure to include everyone in the playlist making process and when you’re running low on ideas, turn to old standards like The Bealtes, Paul Simon and Stevie Wonder.

Don’t own enough music to make a playlist? If you’ve got a smart phone, you can download the Spotify app and sign up for a free account. With a free account, you can create playlists. You may not be able to listen to the songs in a particular order, and there may be advertisements every so often, but it gives you access to millions of songs.

 

Reminisce While You Pack

Packing can be a daunting, stressful experience. Start early to give yourself plenty of time to not only go through all your items and throw out the things you no longer need, but so you can also reminisce with friends and family. When you come across old photos, don’t just throw them in a box and move on, take a few minutes to flip through them.

 

Promise Yourself a Reward

We know moving is expensive, but it’s nice to have a little something extra waiting for you at the end (or your children, if you’ve got them). Promise yourself a meal at your favorite restaurant, buy a book to enjoy once you’ve settled in to your new place, or a DVD to watch while you enjoy pizza delivery on your first night.

Give yourself reward to look forward to beyond the relief of being done with the move.

 

Build a Box Fort

Done unpacking? Got kids? Then let them fulfil their dreams of a cardboard castle. Don’t have kids? Who cares! It’ll probably be years before you’ll have so many cardboard boxes at your disposal and you aren’t getting any younger. Maybe it’s a temporary fortress for your cat or dog. Either way, have fun. I know the kid in the picture below did.

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To Rent or Not to Rent

Our services fit into three categories: full service, labor only, and packing.

Of those three options our labor only services are the most versatile. Whether it’s moving items within in your home, loading a truck for a cross-country move or moving locally, our labor only services can work for you. Without the truck, the hourly rate is a bit lower and subsequently, it tends to seem like the more economical option.

That said, the cost difference between labor only and full service may not be as large as you’d expect and when you consider all of the factors associated with the two options. You may even find yourself convinced that the little bit extra in cost is well worth the peace of mind and convenience.

Cost

When comparing full service to labor only, there is the potential to save 10 – 20% in overall cost depending on the size and type of moving vehicle, length of rental, and the need for additional equipment. With our full-service option, all equipment to move your items safely and efficiently is included (dollies, basket trucks and bungee cords). With most truck rentals, no moving equipment is included free of cost.

Winner: Labor Only. Unless you’re needing to keep the truck overnight for some reason. Renting your own truck will almost always be cheaper.

Risk

With decreased cost, comes increased risk. You become responsible for the vehicle and safely driving your items from one location to another to be loaded and unloaded.

Additionally, when renting from U-Haul or Budget a reservation is only an acknowledgement of preference. If they no longer have your requested vehicle type and size when you arrive to pick up your rental, you may end up with a larger truck. This can lead to parking issues, a more stressful driving experience, and, without the proper tie-down materials, can mean a more dangerous situation for your items in transit.

Winner: Full Service. Without any real guarantee, labor only has several risks when compared to a full-service option.

Convenience

With the full-service option, there’s less to keep track of. You place a deposit, reserve time on our calendar and your time is guaranteed. Having that time set aside will give you the peace of mind needed to focus on the other aspects of moving. You no longer need to worry about driving and taking care of the vehicle or your items because our drivers have done tens of thousands of moves with our standard 26’ box trucks.

Winner: Full Service. As you might expect, the slightly more expensive option is the most convenient.

For the sake of understanding, we’ve laid out a price comparison for a move from Richfield to Eagan, based on our average service length of 3.25 hours:

fullvpartial-comparison

In the end, both options have their pros and cons. One is not necessarily better than the other. The best option will vary depending on preference and situation. Our only hope is that with this information you can better evaluate your moving needs and make the decision process as simple and stress free as possible.

Tipping Your Movers

At some point someone decided 15% of the final bill was the appropriate amount to tip a server when dining out. Seeing as we eat out quite a bit more frequently than we hire a moving service, it’s no surprise there isn’t a similar, commonly held belief like this when it comes to tipping movers.

As a rule of thumb, we suggest 5% of the total bill for movers that provide adequate service. With that as a reference point, you might tip 10-15%, if the service was exceptional, and you may decide to forego tipping, if you felt the service was subpar. It’s all pretty simple once you have 5% as a starting point.

 

TippingMovers

 

How To Tip

When you’re at a restaurant, you have the opportunity to calculate your tip on your own time. You then are able to walk away without interacting with your server again. With movers you are often times handing them cash directly, or writing in a gratuity amount while standing immediately next to them, which can make the exchange seem awkward.

While we can’t speak for all moving companies, our movers are trained to not make any assumptions when it comes to the tip. They may mention that you have the opportunity to write in a gratuity amount on the final paperwork, but you won’t see them lingering or holding a hand out after the paperwork is complete.

If you still feel uncomfortable, you can hand the movers your cash or check tip in an envelope. Our movers are able to accept monetary tips as checks, cash and via credit card.

 

Alternatives

Tipping is NOT a requirement, and money is not the only way to show your appreciation. Some of our movers favorite tips have been mid-service food, or odd, unwanted furniture pieces. Don’t be afraid to offer your movers the TV stand you no longer want.

Additionally, calling the company you booked the service with after your move and sharing positive feedback about the movers can act as a sort of tip. At College Muscle Movers, such a call can mean a Jimmy John’s gift card or similar reward for your movers.

 

If you’re curious how other’s handle tipping their moversApartment Guide conducted a survey among 1,000 adults in the U.S. in 2013 on this topic. Check out the infographic they made with the results below.

 

May_MovingEtiquette

Moving Day Survival Kit

There are many things to consider when you’re moving. It’s never as simple as getting your items from one location to another. And, whether you hire professional movers or plan to enlist the help of your friends and family, there’s always the chance that something doesn’t go according to plan.

On top of that, the process can be extremely tiring. You might not want to take the time to dig out your toiletries, you might find yourself easily frustrated when trying to locate your tools to reassemble your bed, and you will almost definitely find that you don’t want to sleep in the clothes you moved in.

To avoid all these troubles, we offer the sage advice of compiling a “Moving Survival Kit’ before your move.

 

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What exactly is a Moving Survival Kit?

It’s all the essential items you might need during or immediately after your move, packed into one box. In most cases, you’ll want to transport it yourself between your old and your new location.

 

What all should I include in my Moving Survival Kit?

 

First Aid

Whenever there are people moving heavy items it’s a good idea to have some first aid readily available. Don’t let an injury turn into a mad dash to find the box with the bandages.

 

Nourishment

During the move, you’re probably going to need a little pick me up. Make some homemade trail mix in some tupperware. We suggest a simple mixture of M&M’s, peanuts and raisins. If you have time, you could also make up some PB&J sandwiches for a mid-move meal.

For your most cost effective beverage option, we suggest packing water bottles. There’s a good chance your new residence has running water. So, why not save the planet from extra plastic in a landfill and save your self a few bucks.

 

Paper Towels

Let’s be honest, no one wants to cook after a long day of moving. You also probably don’t want to go out to eat, which leaves two options: running out to grab fast food or delivery. In the case that you opt for delivery, you’re going to want at least some paper towels.

 

Toilet Paper

You don’t want to be digging through boxes when nature calls, make sure you include a few rolls of toilet paper in your kit.

 

Tools

It can be as simple as a multi-tool or as comprehensive as a portable tool kit. Either way, you’re going to need to get through the packing tape you used on your boxes and you’re going to need someway to reassemble your furniture.

If you don’t want to deal with any disassembly or reassembly, keep College Muscle Movers in mind. We’re willing to help with disassembly and reassembly at no extra cost.

 

Pillows, Blankets & Clothing

At the very least, pack a blanket and pillow for each family member and some comfortable sleeping clothes. The last thing you want to deal with is sleeping in uncomfortable, potentially sweaty clothes with no blanket or pillow. Getting some good rest will make all the difference after a long day.

 

Important Documents

You may not need immediate access to things like your birth certificates or social security cards, but you also probably don’t want to have to go through the process of replacing them. Knowing exactly where they are during the entirety of your move will save you from any potential stress.