How To Move Your Plants

Plants can add so much to a home; not only are they decorative but they can also increase oxygen levels and clean the air in your home.  So with all that our lovely houseplants provide for us and our homes, it makes sense that we would only want to take good care of them.

Although the process of taking care of plants during a move can be a little tedious, its well worth it.  It all starts before the move and ends a little while after your move, as it takes time for your plants to acclimate to their new setting.

 

Preparing Your Plants

Place your smaller pots into cardboard boxes and surround the pot with crunched up newspapers. This prevents the plant from tipping over during transportation. For extra safety, move any plants in clay or ceramic pots to plastic pots at least two weeks prior to your move.

For larger plants, prune and trim as much as possible. Be sure to check with your local nursery or online before pruning as there are a several species of plants that do not react well to pruning.

For all plants, be sure to water the day before your move and prevent any potential messes in the moving vehicle.  This especially important in the winter, because if the soil has too much water during the move, then there is the potential for freezing. Another way to protect during the brisk winter climate is to cover the plants with an old sheet or tissue paper. Even the smallest contact with extreme cold temperatures can cause trauma to the plant.

If you are moving to a new state with a potentially different climate, do some research to understand how your new home will suit your plants.

If your house looks like this, you may have a big task ahead of you.

Your Plants and Professional Movers

If you have opted to work with a professional moving company and you would like for them to help transport a few of your houseplants, be sure to ask them prior to the move if they are willing to handle plants. During winter months, some moving companies will not transport them as most moving trucks do not have heat in the box.

No matter what, be sure to check for insects and parasites prior to the move and apply insecticide safely prior to the move.

 

Long Distance Moving

If you are driving cross-country to your new home, then there are a few extra steps to ensure the safety of your plants.

First, it is important to check in advance with any states that you will be going through that they allow the transportation of the plants.  To prevent the spreading of certain insects, there is a certification that some states require prior to moving. It’s beneficial to research this ahead of time to avoid any issues. The National Plant Board has very helpful information regarding each state’s regulations.

If you know that the driving trip will take more than a day, then be sure that your plants are still receiving adequate water and light. Be mindful of the temperature in the car too, and never leave them in a vehicle overnight in case of drastic temperature changes.

If you have chosen to ship your plants, then be sure you understand the potential expenses and risks.

Shipping your plants can be very expensive and there are various regulations on carriers which means that you will need to ensure that this is something your selected shipping company can do. Furthermore, there are no guarantees with shipping as you are responsible for appropriately packaging the plant.

 

Moving Day

If you do opt to put your plants into the moving vehicle, then be sure that they are the last items on and the first items off.  Many movers will recommend that you transport them yourself because your car will often be able to provide a safer temperature and the plants may experience less movement impact as well.

 

Post Move

Once you have moved into your new home and you begin settling in, be sure to give your plants that same opportunity. They will need time to adjust to the new environment. If you notice a slight loss of leaves, do not worry, this is fairly normal with any environment change. Finally, be sure not to immediately place the plants back into direct sunlight. Ease them back into it and allow them to acclimate.