Cleaning Up After Your Pets

Moving to a new home can be a lot of work. Adding pets into the mix only complicates matters. Pets don’t understand the reasons humans have for moving. Dogs and cats will often be upset by a change in their lifestyle or habits. Your pet’s emotional turmoil doesn’t even take into account the steps you’ll have to go through when cleaning up after pets. Usually, the more animals you have, the less clean your home becomes. This is true of cats, dogs, and small children.

Even cute ones.
Even cute ones.

That doesn’t mean you need to let your home turn into some sort of old-fashioned zoo, however. You can keep your house free of stinky litter, messes, and allergens (mostly) by simply following a few simple tips to clean up after your pet. A lot of these tips are especially relevant if you’re ever planning on moving out, and want to shape up before new tenants or owners arrive. Here are some some tips we’ve collected over the years that can help you when you’re cleaning up after your pets.

1. Keep Pet Supplies Centralized

Do your best to keep all of your pet supplies in one room or section of your home. A bedroom, a closet, a porch: whatever makes the most sense for you. Keeping food, water and litter (for cats) in one location makes it a lot easier to keep everything clean. Messes are harder to deal with when you need to hunt them down.

If you live in a small house or apartment (or it’s just crowded), this might not be an option. Still, do your best to make cleaning up after your pet convenient. Try to keep litter boxes and water bowls away from doors and frequently traveled paths so that messes don’t get tracked around.

2. Don’t Wait to Clean Up Messes

Cleaning up messes while they’re still wet is your best bet. Feces, urine, vomit, hairballs: all of these get more difficult and time-consuming if you wait to let them dry and stick to whatever surface they’re on. It’ll also prevent stains and keep your home smelling cleaner.

Beyond this, animals (especially cats and dogs) have very keen noses. Cleaning immediately and cleaning well can help dissuade an animal from thinking it’s found the perfect new location to leave you a present.

3. Get Rid of Rugs and Carpets

If you have dogs or cats, your carpet is going to get nasty. It’ll naturally collect pet hair and dander, not to mention how difficult it is to really clean it well. Even if you steam and shampoo your rugs or carpets after a mess, they’ll likely still hold onto odors.

4. Clean Regularly

One of the biggest steps you can take is to clean regularly. Even if it doesn’t seem like there’s a mess, sweeping and mopping and generally cleaning up will work wonders for prevention of odors, stains, and other undesirables.

5. Lots of Trips and Litter Boxes

If you have dogs or cats, don’t give them a good reason to let loose in the house. Dogs should be walked often, and cats should have at least one litter box for each feline. This can be a lot of trouble, especially if you work a lot and already have trouble cleaning up after your pets, but it will save you time in the long run. Plus, your pets will be happier!

Hopefully some of these tips will help you keep your new home clean, or make your current home cleaner. If you have any other questions related to moving, don’t forget to contact College Muscle Movers!

 

Obligatory cat tax
Obligatory cat picture

 

The Story of The Vengeful Tow Truck

College Muscle Movers is one of the premier moving companies in the Twin Cities area. We’ve got years of experience under our belt, and that means we’ve got the corresponding knowledge to help you complete your move as smoothly and efficiently as possible. We’ve moved during the dead of winter, and during the dog days of summer. We’ve moved in marshy swamplands and tight apartment complexes.

We move a lot, and we’d like to share some of that experience with you! Today we’ll share a short story about parking in Minnesota. One of the things people often forget to think about when they’re planning their move is logistics. Vehicle rental, parking, transportation: it’s easy to forget about these things when you’re trying to move. Parking is a particularly big one. It’s easy to forget how hard it is to find parking, especially if you’re driving around a 26-foot truck.

This is the story of the Vengeful Tow Truck.

Avoid this.
Avoid this.

It was a cold day in early spring, with chill winds and cloudy skies. The unload for the move was scheduled in Uptown, where parking is tight. The customer had borrowed a friends 4WD Subaru to use in addition to hiring CMM for the majority of the larger furniture. They’d just finished parking the Subaru with all of their necessities when the movers arrived. Lease, driver’s license, change of clothes, phone, computer: everything was neatly packed away for their first day in a new home. The movers went inside with the customer and went through the game plan: what was getting moved, where it was getting moved to, how it would be packed, etc. Standard practice.

When they went back outside, the Subaru was gone. Just missing. Turns out there was no parking on the street outside the apartment, thanks to the ever-complex rules of seasonal parking in Minneapolis. The movers finished up the unload just in time for the customer to go and retrieve their car from the impound lot. Everything turned out fine, but it was definitely a bit of a headache.

Off-street parking is a huge luxury in the Twin Cities. No one wants to deal with the snowy roads or sidewalks during the winter, and your car will fare considerably better if it’s not kept outside. Unfortunately, most people in Minneapolis will be parking on the street.

If you’re moving and planning on parking on the street for any length of time, your best bet is to contact the city (Minneapolis and St. Paul, respectively). They should be able to provide you with a reserved space. This will ensure that you don’t waste time trying to find parking, and also that you have enough room if you need to fit a huge truck into a space. The same advice holds true for apartment complexes. Try to let your apartment complex know in advance if you’ll be moving so that they can secure parking for you. This will always save you time (and sometimes money!)

Most of all, remember to stay calm while moving! It can be stressful, and you’re likely to run into the unexpected. Just do your best to prepare, and take life in stride. If the move starts becoming too much to handle, contact College Muscle Movers. We’re here to help!

The Budget: Save Money Moving

Budget can a huge consideration for people when they move, especially first-time homeowners or young people going off to college. Moving is a big deal, and anytime you shake up your life you’re bound to run into a few hidden costs. Today we’re going to offer some tips you can follow to help you save money moving.

 

Make Sure You’re Prepared

There’s a lot of little tasks to finish doing before you get to the actual moving part. It’s tempting to put off budgeting and planning and just run with the excitement of moving, but prepare yourself before you make the leap! A new living situation means new costs. Planning will make your whole life easier.

Don’t be tempted to snap up the first apartment you see (unless you’ve already been putting off planning and have no choice). Make sure the location is a good fit, and do your best to make sure the landlords/neighbors/previous owners are good people.

 

Save Up

Most importantly, be certain that you can afford your new space. Generally, you don’t want your rent to exceed 30% of your income. For millennials and other young people, this can sometimes be a challenge. Housing is expensive. Still, it’s a good rule to keep in mind, and it will help you in the long run. Beyond that, you might be scrambling to find a new job or waiting on a paycheck. Be careful here.
There are usually unexpected costs involved in moving. You won’t know what they are until they hit (otherwise they wouldn’t be unexpected), but saving up money before you move is a good way to be ready. In the months leading up to the move, stay as frugal as you can so that you can handle some of the extra costs you might incur: repairs, furniture, parking tickets, moving trucks, etc.

 

Buy Used

Don’t worry about impressing your friends with an Italian leather sofa. If you’re trying to meet a budget, you’ll want to avoid furniture sets. Despite all the chairs, recliners, couches and rockers that we surround ourselves with, humans have pretty basic needs. You’ll need a place to sleep, a place to sit/work, and a place to eat. That’s about it.

Consider picking up furniture off of Craigslist or from friends. You might even discover that you can furnish your apartment or house for free! People are always trying to get rid of old furniture. Don’t forget that old adage: one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

Reeeeeaaaaaal comfy.
Probably super comfy.

Essentials

If you’re living on your own for the first time, there are a lot of essential costs you’ve probably never thought about. Light bulbs, toilet paper and food don’t just appear out of thin air. You need to stock all this stuff yourself.

It’s very likely that you’ll want to get a lot of this stuff as soon as you move in. Consider checking at a local dollar store for cheap light bulbs and cleaning supplies. Usually you can find these items for a bargain at discount establishments.

And let’s not forget about food.

Fill Your Fridge

One of the easiest ways to save money over the long term is to cook for yourself. Buy cheap, healthy ingredients and avoid going out. You’re guaranteed to spend more if you eat out or get takeout, and the costs can stack up dramatically. Millennials are especially susceptible to this: it eats up a lot of money from college students who don’t have convenient kitchen access, or anyone who is “too busy” to cook. Just remember, there are lots of options that are quick, healthy, AND cheap. Do yourself a favor and keep food on hand so that you won’t be tempted.

Hopefully some of these tips will help you save money moving. If you have any other questions about an upcoming move, give College Muscle Movers a call at 1-800-818-8449. We’d love to help!

Moving Your Hot Tub

There are a number of items that can make moving a real headache. Usually it’s because they’re just too big. Overstuffed couches, pianos, dining room tables, hot tubs: this stuff isn’t going to fit in your car. That’s where moving companies like CMM come in. We can help you plan out your whole moving process. There’s no good substitute for experience.

Still, if it’s just one item bogging you down, maybe we can help. Today we’ll talk about how best to move a hot tub yourself. Hot tubs are pricey, and notoriously difficult to move around. Step-by-step, we’ll run through the smartest and safest way to get your tub from point A to point B.

tub
What You’ll Need

First of all, make sure you’ve got help. You’ll want extra help when you’re moving around a hot tub, if only to make sure it’s safe. Hot tubs come in different shapes and sizes, so make sure you’ve got enough muscle to back you up when it’s time to move. Also make sure you have straps. You’ll also want appliance/furniture dollies on hand so that you can roll your tub. They’ll come in handy if you have to carry it very far.

Step One

To begin with, make sure that the tub is completely drained and disconnected. No electrical, gas, or water lines should be hooked up when you try to move it. This is one of the easiest ways to damage your hot tub. After you disconnect everything, make sure all of the cables and lines are stowed away securely. You may need to tape them down.

Your job will be much easier if you let the tub dry completely. Water is heavy, and you don’t want to move around any more weight than you have to.

Step Two

Once everything is dry and disconnect, you can enlist your muscle. Be sure that everyone has enough room to help lift. If your hot tub is a small, single piece, you can lift it up and get it to where it needs to go. If you are just moving the lining, you’ll want to support the structure while you carry it so that it doesn’t bend or break.  One by one, slide straps or two-by-fours under each corner of the tub. This will keep it stable.

Step Three

Now it’s simply a matter of carrying your tub to where it needs to go. Make sure your path and destination are clear before you pick up the tub. If you’re moving a long way, use the dolly to help save effort. Rolling is always easier than lifting.

You’ll also want to be sure your tub is strapped down inside the truck, if that’s where it’s going. Any heavy objects like that need to be carefully secured to make sure that the truck and tub don’t get damaged.

Step Four

When you reach the final destination for your hot tub, make sure you know exactly where you want the tub. If there is anything in the way, move it before you start. Set the tub down carefully: if you let it drop, there’s a high chance you can damage it, and no one likes a leaky hot tub. After you’ve set it down, just pull your straps, dollies or two-by-fours free.

Step Five

The final step? Reconnect everything. Now is when you make sure all of the lines and cables are intact, and everything is working properly. If you’ve done everything right, you could be soaking in that hot tub right after you move it!

Above all, remember that a professional moving company is your best bet. While College Muscle Movers no longer moves hot tubs, there are speciality moving companies that can take care of all of this for you.